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"Let there arise out of you a band of people inviting to all that is good enjoining what is right and forbidding what is wrong; they are the ones to attain felicity".
(surah Al-Imran,ayat-104)
 
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Assamualikum wa ramatulahi wa barakatuhu
 
dear brother
 
 
iam muslim living in japan and i would like you to use your contact and effort toward islam .i ppreciate your efforts about different things especially islam .
 
now a days the new about Afia siddiqui has been circulated in news 
 
As a represntatvie of muslim i request you to make awarness among muslims about Afia siddiqui casethis issue here is video i serach on youtube
 
 
next is bbc article about afia siddqui
 
 
iam waiting for your reply .
Wasalam
your brother in islam
 Reply:   Dr. Aafia Siddiqui
Replied by(khd1999) Replied on (16/Aug/2008)

Assalam-u-alaikum,

First of all I want to thank our government for selling our daughters and mothers.

I saw a letter "Aafia Siddiqui: Us envoy's version" from US ambassador on the subject matter in Dawn newspaper.

I see this letter as a piece of crab. I have some questions

1-) If Dr. Siddiqui was not held in Bagram prison and was not tortured, would american have enough courage to open this prision to media and let the people find out the mystery 650 prisioner.
2-) US ambassador says Dr. Aafia will receive a fair trial. Is she talking of the American Justice that we saw in Abu Gharib and Guantanamo bay illegal prisons.
3-) What is crime of Dr. Aafia's children. Is it fair to destroy the life of little kids. Is this the American Justice she talking about
4-) She accuses Dr. Aafia of seizing a weapon and firing - oh I want to salute her on her version of story. What she has to say on killing 22 Pakistani soldiers and firing missiles in Pakistani territory. Is this the open-mindedness she is talking about in her letter. Oh I know the open mindedness of bombing Al Jazeera.

Regards Khalid Munir
 
 Reply:   Dr. Aafia Siddiqui
Replied by(khd1999) Replied on (16/Aug/2008)

Assalam-u-alaikum,

First of all I want to thank our government for selling our daughters and mothers.

I saw a letter "Aafia Siddiqui: Us envoy's version" from US ambassador on the subject matter in Dawn newspaper.

I see this letter as a piece of crab. I have some questions

1-) If Dr. Siddiqui was not held in Bagram prison and was not tortured, would american have enough courage to open this prision to media and let the people find out the mystery 650 prisioner.
2-) US ambassador says Dr. Aafia will receive a fair trial. Is she talking of the American Justice that we saw in Abu Gharib and Guantanamo bay illegal prisons.
3-) What is crime of Dr. Aafia's children. Is it fair to destroy the life of little kids. Is this the American Justice she talking about
4-) She accuses Dr. Aafia of seizing a weapon and firing - oh I want to salute her on her version of story. What she has to say on killing 22 Pakistani soldiers and firing missiles in Pakistani territory. Is this the open-mindedness she is talking about in her letter. Oh I know the open mindedness of bombing Al Jazeera.

Regards Khalid Munir
 
 Reply:   Aafia faces charges of assault
Replied by(Noman) Replied on (6/Aug/2008)
The story of her arrest is one of the strangest since the Sept 11 attacks on the United States by al Qaeda in 2001. The ambassador of Pakistan made the request for consular access on Monday,
Aafia faces charges of assaulting US troops

Wednesday, August 06, 2008
NEW YORK: A Pakistani woman accused of grabbing a US soldier's rifle and trying to shoot an Army captain while in custody in Afghanistan will face a US judge in New York on Tuesday on attempted murder charges.

Pakistan's ambassador to Washington Husain Haqqani sought consular access to Aafia Siddiqui, a US-trained neuroscientist suspected of links to al-Qaeda, after she was brought to the United States on Monday.

Accounts of her arrest and the shooting incident differed between US prosecutors and Afghan police. Siddiqui, 36, was arrested outside the governor's office in Afghanistan's Ghazni province on July 17 after police searched her handbag and found documents on making explosives, excerpts from the book "Anarchist's Arsenal" and descriptions of New York City landmarks, federal prosecutors said in a statement.

While detained in a meeting room, Siddiqui grabbed the M-4 assault rifle from a US Army warrant officer who had placed the weapon on the floor not knowing she was being held there, the statement said. Two FBI agents were also in the room.

Siddiqui fired at least twice at the captain but the shots missed as a military interpreter lunged at her. The warrant officer then shot her with his pistol, the statement said. "Despite being shot, Siddiqui struggled with the officers when they tried to subdue her; she struck and kicked them while shouting in English that she wanted to kill Americans," it said, adding she then lost consciousness and was given medical treatment.

The New York Times said Siddiqui had links to at least two of 14 suspected high-level al-Qaeda members held at a prison camp at the US naval base at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. The story of her arrest is one of the strangest since the Sept 11 attacks on the United States by al Qaeda in 2001. The ambassador of Pakistan made the request for consular access on Monday, APP said.

Afghan police in Ghazni told a different story. They said officers searched Siddiqui after reports of her suspicious behaviour and found maps of Ghazni, including one of the governor's house, and arrested her along with a teenage boy.

US troops requested the woman be handed over to them but the police refused, a senior Ghazni police officer said. US soldiers then disarmed the Afghan police, at which point Siddiqui approached the Americans complaining of mistreatment by the police, the officer said.

The US troops, the officer said, "thinking that she had explosives and would attack them as a suicide bomber, shot her and took her." The boy remained in police custody. US officials believe Siddiqui was in Pakistan until her arrest in neighbouring Afghanistan, the New York Times said.

By Azim Mian adds New York: Michael J Garcia, the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, Mark J Mershon, the Assistant Director-in-Charge of the New York Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Raymond W Kelly, the Police Commissioner of the City of New York, announced on Monday the arrest of Aafia Siddiqui on charges related to her attempted murder and assault of United States officers and employees in Afghanistan.

Siddiqui arrived in New York Monday evening and will be presented on Tuesday before a United States Magistrate Judge in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

According to the complaint filed in Manhattan federal court: on July 17, 2008, officers of the Ghazni province Afghanistan National Police (ANP) observed Siddiqui outside the Ghazni governor's compound. ANP officers questioned Siddiqui, regarded her as suspicious, and searched her handbag. In it, they found numerous documents describing the creation of explosives, as well as excerpts from the Anarchist's Arsenal. Siddiqui's papers included descriptions of various landmarks in the United States, including in New York City. Siddiqui was also in possession of substances that were sealed in bottles and glass jars.

On July 18, 2008, a party of United States personnel, including two FBI special agents, a United States army warrant Officer, a United States army captain, and United States military interpreters, arrived at the Afghan facility where Siddiqui was being held. The personnel entered a second floor meeting room "” unaware that Siddiqui was being held there, unsecured, behind a curtain.

The warrant officer took a seat and placed his United States army M-4 rifle on the floor next to the curtain. Shortly after the meeting began, the Captain heard a woman yell from the curtain and, when he turned, saw Siddiqui holding the warrant officer's rifle and pointing it directly at the captain. Siddiqui said, "May the blood of [unintelligible] be directly on your (unintelligible, possibly head or hands)."

The interpreter seated closest to Siddiqui lunged at her and pushed the rifle away as Siddiqui pulled the trigger. Siddiqui fired at least two shots but no one was hit. The warrant officer returned fire with a 9mm service pistol and fired approximately two rounds at Siddiqui's torso, hitting her at least once.

Despite being shot, Siddiqui struggled with the officers when they tried to subdue her; she struck and kicked them while shouting in English that she wanted to kill Americans. After being subdued, Siddiqui temporarily lost consciousness. The agents and officers then rendered medical aid to Siddiqui.

Siddiqui, a 36-year-old Pakistani woman who previously resided in the United States, is charged in a criminal complaint filed in the Southern District of New York with one count of attempting to kill United States officers and employees and one count of assaulting United States officers and employees. If convicted, Siddiqui faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison on each charge.

Garcia praised the investigative work of the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF), the Federal Bureau of Investigation and New York City Police Department. He also expressed his gratitude to the Office of International Affairs of the Criminal Division of the United States Department of Justice and the United States Department of State for their assistance in the case.

Garcia also thanked the United States Attorney's Office for the District of Massachusetts for their assistance. Garcia said the investigation is continuing. Assistant United States Attorney Christopher L Lavigne is in charge of the prosecution. The charges and allegations contained in the complaint are merely accusations and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 
 Reply:   What a lier this America Is :
Replied by(Noman) Replied on (5/Aug/2008)
.
If for a moment one accept this story then it will mean
1-She wasn't in American custody from last five years
2-America don't know anything about her children, as they didn't capture them.
3-She is injured because of cross fire.
 
Now one may think, why this story surfaced by America i.e what advantages they are trying to achieve
 
This story came to surface, because now there is huge pressure building up on them to surface her and as she is wounded and it seems her children are no more alive and she has became mad as well, so American thought to come up with a story which will gave them some justification and as she is out of her mind and wont be able to give any statement so they can stress on their version of story.
 
Now the main questions arises are
in 2003 Federal Minister Faisal Saleh Hayat acknowledged that she is in American custody, so if they took the custody of her in 2003, then it means American tried to interrogate her that time and that time her children were among her, so if she even attacked them then it should be way back in 2003, then how come she is still injured.
she was kidnapped from Pakistan not from Afghani tan and the biggest of the Q is
Where are her kids, which i can assume and expect from Vultures American that they might have used them to brake her and during this process may be her children got martyred.
 
May Allah give us the strength to take her and her children's revenge.
 
WASHINGTON: A Pakistani scientist Dr. Afia Siddiqui accused of shooting at U.S. officers while in Afghan custody last month has been extradited to the United States.

According to US media reports, onn July 18 Siddiqui shot at two FBI special agents, a U.S. Army warrant officer, an Army captain and military interpreters who unknowingly entered a room where she was being held unsecured at an Afghan facility.

The warrant officer returned fire with a pistol, shooting Siddiqui at least once. She struggled with the officers before she lost consciousness, and was then given medical attention.

US officials said that Afia Siddiqui was arrested outside the Ghazni governor's compound where they found bomb-making instructions, excerpts from the "Anarchist's Arsenal," papers with descriptions of U.S. landmarks and substances sealed in bottles and glass jars.

 
 Reply:   Please join the ralley against
Replied by(Haque) Replied on (4/Aug/2008)
Please join the ralley against kidnapping of Dr. Aafia Siddiqui and her 3 young "terrorist" sons of 7, 5 and 1/2 year old. The International Zionists and their puppets Bush and Mush kidnappe

Bismillah hir Rehman nir Raheem
 
Please join the ralley against kidnapping of Dr. Aafia Siddiqui and her 3 young "terrorist" sons of 7, 5 and 1/2 year old. The International Zionists and their puppets Bush and Mush kidnapped her and her sons. We demand their immediate release. The real fault of Dr. Aafia Siddiqui was that she distributed copies of Quran among Americans to have better understanding of Islam. Teh Zionists are so scared of Quran that they kidnapped her along with her 3 sons in March 2003 and subjected to worst terrorism. The venue is Prade Ground, close to GEO office, Fazl-e-Haq Road, Blue Area Islamabad on Thursday at 5:30 p.m. Please forward the message and join the protest for release fo your sister and her sons.



To:
From: taliba.quran@gmail.com
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2008 20:49:50 -0700
Subject: [Green_Birds] Pakistani scientist alive, in custody - The Boston Globe

It's Aafia.... may Allah subhanuhu wa ta'ala CURSE those responsible for this!!!!

http://www.boston.com/news/world/asia/articles/2008/08/03/pakistani_scientist_alive_in_custody/


 

Pakistani scientist alive, in custody

FBI linked her to Al Qaeda in Hub

Female activists rallied in Karachi, Pakistan, on Thursday demanding the release of Aafia Siddiqui, who is in custody in Afghanistan. (RIZWAN TABASSUM/ AFP/ Getty Images)
Email|Print|Single Page| Text size "“ + By Farah Stockman Globe Staff / August 3, 2008
WASHINGTON - Five years after her disappearance, an MIT-trained Pakistani neuroscientist accused of belonging to an Al Qaeda cell based in Boston, is alive and in custody in Afghanistan, her family's attorney said yesterday.
"It has been confirmed by the FBI that Aafia Siddiqui is alive," said Elaine Whitfield Sharp, a lawyer for Siddiqui's family, who said she spoke to an FBI official on Thursday. "She is injured but alive, and she is in Afghanistan."
The news sheds some light on one of the most intriguing local mysteries in the war on terrorism.
Siddiqui, who lived in Roxbury and studied at Brandeis University as well as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, disappeared with her three children while visiting her parents' home in Karachi, Pakistan, in March 2003, around the same time the FBI announced that it wanted to question her.
For five years, US and Pakistani authorities have denied knowing her whereabouts. But human rights groups and Siddiqui's relatives have long suspected that she had been captured in Karachi and secretly taken into custody.
If Siddiqui was arrested in Pakistan and turned over to the United States, it would highlight a crucial instance of intelligence cooperation between the two countries during a historic low point in their relations.
Earlier this week, US officials accused Pakistan's intelligence service of actively cooperating with tribal, pro-Taliban militants engaged in killing US troops in Afghanistan. In a White House meeting Monday, President Bush confronted Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani of Pakistan with intercepted phone calls between Pakistan's powerful ISI intelligence service and the militants.
Marvin Weinbaum, a Pakistan specialist at the Middle East Institute, said that Pakistan has a history of reacting to pressure from the United States by publicly revealing that it has captured and turned over high-value terrorism suspects. Usually, such cooperation is kept quiet because of anti-American sentiments.
"But when it suits their purpose to advertise that they are cooperative with US intelligence, all too often, someone high profile is revealed to have been captured and turned over," he said.
On Thursday, an FBI official visited Siddiqui's brother in Houston to deliver the news that she is alive and in custody, Sharp said, but the visit raised as many questions as it answered. FBI officials would not say who is holding her or reveal the fate of her three young, American-born children.
"If she's in US custody, they want to know where she is," Sharp said. "Who has got her? And does she need medical care?"
The FBI and the Justice Department declined to comment. Late last week, Siddiqui's photo still appeared on the FBI's list of people wanted for questioning.
Military documents declassified in recent years suggest that Siddiqui is suspected of having ties to several key terrorism suspects being held at the Guantanamo Bay detention center.
She is believed to have links to Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, alleged mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and allegedly arranged travel documents for another suspected terrorist. Papers in Guantanamo Bay also indicate that she married Ali Abd al-Aziz Ali, an alleged Al Qaeda facilitator who intended to blow up gas stations or poison water reservoirs in the United States.
The three men were among 14 high-value suspects brought to Guantanamo Bay in 2006 after years of secret detention in CIA prisons in eastern Europe. At the time, Bush said no suspects remained in so-called "black sites," but human rights groups contradicted him, saying there were still suspects being held incommunicado at US facilities such as the Bagram airbase detention center in Afghanistan.
In a 2006 report, Amnesty International listed Siddiqui as among a number of "disappeared" suspects in the war on terrorism.
In recent weeks, Pakistani newspapers reported that a lawyer, Javed Iqbal Jaffery, had petitioned a Pakistani court for Siddiqui's release and vowed to bring her detention to the UN human rights commissioner.
According to the reports, Jaffrey alleged that Siddiqui was jailed in Kabul after being held in Bagram; a British journalist reached a similar conclusion based on interviews with prisoners released from Bagram.
Sharp said she believes those reports increased pressure on US and Pakistani authorities to divulge more information. "I don't believe that they just found Aafia," Sharp said. "I believe that she was there all along."


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 Reply:   FBI confirmed that Dr Afia is
Replied by(Noman) Replied on (4/Aug/2008)
.

NASIR JAFFRY
The US air base at Bagram, Afghanistan

Islamabad, Aug 1: Islamabad is abuzz with rumours about the presence of a Pakistani doctor, Afia Siddiqui, in one of Afghanistan's most notoriousprisons in Bagram.

Known as "Prisoner No. 650" and the "Grey Lady", Siddiqui was allegedly handed over to the US six years ago for her links with the al Qaida.

While home secretary Syed Kamal Shah and other senior home ministry officials have denied the presence of such a lady in Bagram, media reports continue to suggest that she was extradited to the Afghan jail from Karachi with her children. She continues to stay in the prison in humiliating conditions.

"She is subjected to physical and sexual torture by American troops in the jail," Urdu-language newspaper Jang reported.

It said Siddiqui has no separate toilet facilities and has to have a bath in full view of the other prisoners. Even leading domestic and international rights groups are raising their voices for Siddiqui.

On July 25, the Asian Human Rights Commission appealed for "everyone's support for the release of Dr Siddiqui and her 3 children who are believed to be held at Bagram jail".

Britain's Lord Nazeer Ahmed asked questions in the House of Lords about the condition of "Prisoner 650". He said she is physically tortured and continuously raped by the officers at the prison. On July 6, a British journalist, Yvonne Ridley, called for help for a Pakistani woman she believes has been held in isolation by the Americans in their Bagram detention centre for over four years.

"I call her the 'Grey Lady' because she is almost a ghost, a spectre whose cries and screams continues to haunt those who hear her," said Ridley. She recently visited Pakistan to spread the message about Siddiqui's condition.


 
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